Abaku is arithmetic for the 21st century

We have a vision of the future generation that will grow up enjoying math. Generation that will use math in daily life as a wonderful tool to explore the world around them, that they don’t leave in school after the class is over. This generation will actively take part in their education; this generation will not settle for existing knowledge but will transform it and explore it in a different manner.

This vision is reflected in our curriculum. Let’s try to fulfill it together.

Count with us

Age

Contents Recommended tool Textbook activity

First period

5-8 years

  • uses natural numbers up to 20, 100, 1 000, 1 000 000
  • can read, write, order and compare them
  • uses equals and non equals sings
  • uses zero
App
Abacube
Board Game
  • Abaku Balls
  • adds and subtracts numbers in given range
  • understands mutual relationship between adding and subtracting and uses it
App
Abacube
Board Game
  • Triads and Tetrads
  • solves simple exercises (from real world) by using basic mathematical operations
App
Abacube
Board Game
  • Abaku Series
  • Traffic in Plusville
  • multiplies single-digit numbers with each other
  • understands mutual relationship between adding and subtracting and uses it
App
Abacube
Board Game
  • Abaku Series
  • Traffic in Plusville

Second period

8-11 years

  • adds, subtracts, multiplies, and divides natural numbers
  • adds and subtracts up to 100 using mental strategies, multiplies and divides within the range of 10×10 multiplication table
  • uses both commutative and associative properties of basic mathematical operations
App
Abacube
Board Game
  • Abaku Series
  • Traffic in Plusville
  • understands mutual relationship between adding and multiplication and between division and subtraction and uses it
  • does result checking
App
Abacube
Board Game
  • seeks, collects, sorts and classifies data
  • reads and constructs simple data tables and charts
App
Abacube
Board Game
  • Traffic in Plusville
  • solves real-life word problems, which solutions are heavily independent of usual school math methods
App
Abacube
Board Game
  • Plusville Hiding Places

Third period

11 – 16 years

  • counts in integer and rational numbers fields
  • uses square and square root
App
Abacube
Board Game
  • Abaku Series
  • Houses in Plusville
  • models and solves situation by using divisibility
  • identifies multiples and divisor of a number
  • uses divisibility rules
  • decomposes a product into multipliers
App
Abacube
Board Game
  • Abaku Series
  • Abaku Date
  • Landline in Plusville
  • License Plates
  • understands geometrical meaning of squares, square roots, cubes and cube roots
App
Abacube
Board Game
  • mathematize simple real-life situations
  • suggests various solving methods and justifies selected method
App
Abacube
Board Game
  •  solves real-life situations by using equations and system of equations
App
Abacube
Board Game
  • Landline in Plusville
  • License Plates
  • seeks, evaluates and processes data
  • compares data sets
App
Abacube
Board Game
  • Traffic in Plusville
  • uses skill of logic and combination for task and problem solving
  • seeks multiple solution
App
Abacube
Board Game
  • Lottery

How do we do it? We teach children to read numbers.

All of us can read. When we see the letters D, O, G, we immediately put them together as a word without any necessary signs or marks, and we immediately see mental image of the animal.

But how about numbers?

When we see numbers 24832 we most likely read the individual numbers (two, four, eight, three, two), or we might read them as one number (twenty four thousand eight hundred and thirty two)… But what else?

If we don’t receive any additional information (sale, phone number…) we quickly forget the number. And usually we don’t really take it in.

In math, we can’t do without additional, auxiliary signs – equation signs, brackets, equal signs. We are not able to look at the above-mentioned series of numbers and see the following equations: 24+8=32, 24÷8=3, 4×8=32, 2×4=8, …

Because no one has ever taught us to do so.

But what if it’s possible to acquire this ability?

What if we present children just numbers without math signs and tell them to make equations by themselves?

Show them Abaku, start using our methodology, and soon you will be surprised. Children will start to play with numbers, enjoy it, and soon they will be able to make equations from any given series of number they see around them – license plates, dates etc. Math will unobtrusively merge with the surrounding world and it will become natural part of it.

It’s like reading or riding a bike – Abaku will teach you to calculate once and for all. And like the ability to read is a prerequisite for love to literature, the ability to calculate forms children’s attitude to math.